Petition

Congress: Keep Toxic BPA Out of Our Bodies and Our Food!

(Photo:Jose Luis Pelaez Inc/Getty Images)

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The Breast Cancer Fund works to connect the dots between breast cancer and exposures to chemicals and radiation in our everyday environments. We translate the growing body of scientific evidence linking breast cancer and environmental exposures into public education and advocacy campaigns that protect our health and reduce breast cancer risk. We help transform how our society thinks about and uses chemicals and radiation, with the goal of preventing breast cancer and sustaining health and life. We find practical solutions so that our children, grandchildren and planet can thrive.

About the Petition

New legislation introduced into both the U.S. Senate and the House of Representatives would remove the toxic chemical bisphenol A from food packaging, including cans and beverage containers.

While BPA has been banned from baby bottles, sippy cups, and infant formula packaging, the hormone-disrupting chemical is still widely used to line food cans. The Ban Poisonous Additives Act of 2014 would direct the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to remove BPA from food packaging, label food packaging that still contains BPA while alternatives are being developed, encourage manufacturers to replace this hazardous chemical with alternatives that are safer for workers and consumers, and require the agency to review the safety of all food packaging.

More than 300 laboratory and human studies have linked low levels of BPA exposure to a staggering number of health problems, including breast cancer, prostate cancer, infertility, early puberty, and diabetes. Even minuscule amounts have been shown to disrupt normal prenatal development.

Tell Congress to make our food safer by banning BPA from food packaging.

To: U.S. House of Representatives, U.S. Senate

I urge you to cosponsor and support the Ban Poisonous Additives Act of 2014.

Bisphenol A is an extremely toxic chemical that has been banned from baby bottles, sippy cups, and infant formula packaging but remains in food cans and beverage containers. BPA leaches out of the plastic or can linings into the food and then enters the bodies of people who eat it. In fact, 92 percent of Americans have detectable levels of BPA in their bodies. A 2013 California study found BPA in the umbilical cord of every one of the 85 pregnant women tested.

Even minuscule amounts of BPA have been linked to big health problems. More than 300 laboratory and human studies have linked small amounts of BPA exposure to a staggering number of health problems, including breast cancer, infertility, early puberty, and diabetes.

Exposure to BPA during pregnancy, infancy, and childhood is of particular concern because hormone disruption during early development can set the stage for later?life diseases, such as breast and prostate cancer. Workers are also at risk. A Canadian study found young women who worked in food canning and plastics manufacturing had a staggering fivefold increase in premenopausal breast cancer.

You can make food safer by banning BPA from food packaging. Please cosponsor and support the Ban Poisonous Additives Act of 2014.

Sincerely,

[Your name here]

Supporters

  • 12230
    Clarissa Valdez
    Laredo, TX
    1 year ago
  • 12229
    Colleen Meagher
    Brooklyn, NY
    1 year ago
  • 12228
    Clara González
    Spain
    1 year ago
  • 12227
    Judy Malone
    Billings, MT
    1 year ago
  • 12226
    Sheryl Benning
    Madison, WI
    1 year ago
  • 12225
    Esther Giraldo
    Floral Park, NY
    1 year ago
  • 12224
    Phillip Border
    Frostburg, MD
    1 year ago
  • 12223
    Jamie Fillmore
    Beaverton, OR
    1 year ago
  • 12222
    Chris Pomeroy
    Austin, TX
    1 year ago
  • 12221
    Lawrence Holtzman
    Miami, FL
    1 year ago
  • 12220
    Donna Redisch
    Tampa, FL
    1 year ago
  • 12219
    Leah Milstein
    New York, NY
    1 year ago
  • 12218
    Carol Smith
    Channahon, IL
    1 year ago
  • 12217
    Peter Mc Cumber
    Morgantown, WV
    1 year ago

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